The Wild by K. Webster

Available: EDITED: No longer available as of 8-10-17

Type: Contemporary

Publisher: Self

My Copy: Bought

Reviewer: Nikki

I brought them to the wilderness because we couldn’t cope with our reality.
The plan was to make a new life that didn’t include heartache.

No people. No technology. No interference.
Just us.
A chance to piece together what was broken.

But the wilderness is untamed and harsh.
Brutal and unforgiving.
It doesn’t give a damn about your feelings.

Tragedy lives there too.
No escaping the truths that won’t let you go.

All you can do is survive where love, no matter how beastly, is the only thing you can truly count on.

Confusing. Wrong. Twisted. Beautiful. Sick.

Love is wild.
And we’re going to set it free.

Warning:
The Wild is an extremely taboo story. Most will find that the themes in this book will make you incredibly uncomfortable. This book is only for the brave, the open-minded, and the ones who crave love in even the most dismal of situations. Extreme sexual themes and violence in certain scenes, which could trigger emotional distress, are found in this story. If you are sensitive to heavy taboo themes, then this story is not for you.

 

****This review may be disturbing for some readers. If you have trigger issues, please stop here. Also, this review will contain spoilers.****

Woah. That was my reaction upon finishing this book, which I should mention I read in one sitting. I heard about this book while I was scrolling through Facebook. Someone on some other review site was talking about it. I liked the cover so I clicked to see what they were saying. I have never read this author before and I like to find out a bit more before I jump the gun and buy something. The first thing I read was how Amazon had pulled the book due to the themes and graphic nature and you couldn’t get it there. By the time this review goes up, that may have changed, but something tells me Webster will have a hard time convincing Amazon to put it back up. But, you never know. **Note** You can still get the paperback on Amazon, but not the e-book.  I read the blurb I posted above along with the vague warning, but who is Amazon to tell me what I can and cannot read. So, I searched, found it on Smashwords and downloaded it.

The Wild is about a family, torn apart by tragedy after the death of a  a child. The mother, a highly depressed, vacant woman, uses the death of one of her children to withdraw into herself completely. Although to be honest, she’s been vacant for much longer, having started going through bouts of depression years before. She spends most of the time in bed and leaves her husband Reed and surviving daughter Devon on their own.

Reed has this idea that to repair the family they need to get off the grid. So he buys a ton of acreage in Alaska, planning on building them a house, by hand, all by himself while they live in a tent and a RV. By this time Devon is 16 and while I found it a bit unbelievable that Devon would willingly give up all the modern world conveniences, I decided to just accept it to see where this book was going. Because I had an inkling from the beginning due to some graphic passages before all the shit hits the fan…

The mother dies pretty quickly, in a freak accident leaving Reed and Devon on their own with no shelter but their wrecked RV, a tent and a cave they had found. The book alternates between both of their POV’s and you guys…it gets weird pretty fast. Remember, Devon is only 16, although she does celebrate her 17th birthday not far into the book for whatever difference it makes (none, absolutely none). But the way she starts looking at her father (manual labor does a body good I guess) and the way he fantasizes about her new womanly body made me squirm with unease. Reed and Devon’s relationship has always seemed a bit too connected, a bit too affectionate. There are flashbacks that say this was happening BEFORE the move to middle of nowhere Alaska. Maybe it’s because they were both starving for attention from the one woman who never gave them any. Maybe it’s because they are fucked up in the head. I dunno, but it was never a normal father/daughter relationship. Especially after the death of Devon’s twin brother.

Everything after this point in the book made me so uncomfortable I nearly stopped reading. And I read some dark, dark shit. But these two, the graphic nature of the sex scenes that happen between them. I almost couldn’t continue. It’s wrong on oh so many levels. Not to say that the writing is bad, in fact, it was seamless and I found myself flying through the book, hating it but needing to finish it at the same time. Even if Devon was at the age of consent, her father is in his forties, and well incest ya’ll.

Being by themselves up in the Alaskan wilderness, Reed evolves over the course of the book. At the beginning of the book he’s a successful real estate mogul but by the end, he’s a mountain man, fueled by obsession and a need to claim Devon on a daily basis. They are constantly fucking so it should be no surprise that she turns up pregnant, several times. There is also a very graphic rape scene (other than by Reed, b/c that was consensual?) featured that was very hard to read. It was stark and brutal as was the rest of the book.

It was compelling but it was wrong. She’s 17. He’s in his 40’s. Trying to read a sex scene that uses the word “Dad” on the regular and not in that weird way some people use it, but like, actually in the “dad” way was almost too much, even for me. I was glad when Reed insisted Devon call him his name, because it let me suspend the ickiness for a bit. There is some suspense and a few surprises (thank GOD for the one surprise), but if I have to say anything about this book it would be to heed the warning. This one is difficult to get through. I may get flack for it, but if I’m honest with myself, I liked the book because it was so brutally done, it’ll stay with me for while. It was engrossing if only for the fact that I was uncomfortable but unable to quit reading.

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